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Keynote Lectures

Technology and Healthcare Transformation: Separate Hype from Reality
Nick Guldemond, Erasmus School of Health Policy & Management, Netherlands

Is ICT Being Designed Really With Older People in Mind?
Liz Mestheneos, 50+Hellas and Past-President Age Platform, Greece

Technology to support Active Aging - Where we are and where to go to
Miriam Vollenbroek-Hutten, University of Twente, Netherlands

 

Technology and Healthcare Transformation: Separate Hype from Reality

Nick Guldemond
Erasmus School of Health Policy & Management
Netherlands
 

Brief Bio
Dr. Guldemond has a background in electric engineering and medicine. He is a key expert on eHealth and integrated care for various international organisations such as WHO Global eHealth Observatory, EU Programmes as European initiative on Healthy and Active Ageing, Knowledge Innovation Community (KIC) Health and KIC Digital, Ambient Assisted Living, Innovative Medicine Initiative and Innovative Medical Device Initiative. He is advisor on eHealth and healthcare transformation for various national/regional eHealth institutes NHS UK, Brazil, Russia, Norway, China, Poland, Germany, Belgium as well as multinational companies in Pharma (Roche, Novartis, Genzyme), Medtech (Philips, MEDTRONIC), health IT (Microsoft, Ascom, Ortec, Vodafone) and finance (Rabobank, Natwest, RBS). Dr. Guldemond is on behalf of the Netherlands Federation of University Medical Centres (NFU) architect of the national eHealth implementation research agenda and health track leader of the big data alliance.


Abstract
Technologies for Ageing Well and eHealth are enabling the paradigm shift from traditional curative oriented healthcare towards an interconnected, integrated care model in which digital solutions play a crucial role. Digitalisation, devices, IoT and AI are clearly acting as catalysts in this irreversible trend. The ultimate question for health and social care systems is how to make this a reality in an efficient and patient-centric way, while maintain access to good quality care affordable for all citizens concerned. In this keynote I reflect on the relation between technology, Value based Healthcare provision, patient empowerment and community based co-creation in relation to transformation. In this respect, it is interesting to show some practices from various countries and see what lessons can be learned.  



 

 

Is ICT Being Designed Really With Older People in Mind?

Liz Mestheneos
50+Hellas and Past-President Age Platform
Greece
 

Brief Bio

Dr. Elizabeth Mestheneos is a UK trained sociologist who worked as an academic in London and then relocated in 1983 to Greece to join her husband in TV/film production. She became an independent social researcher in 1988,  undertaking many projects on refugees, AIDS, the long term unemployed and ageing. The latter became her primary focus researching various issues such as  family care, elder abuse, older workers, homecare services, chronic disease and ICT. She has published widely on these subjects. 

A believer in the role of civil society she co-founded the NGO “50+ Hellas” in 2006 promoting the human rights of older people and their  well being (www.50plus.gr).  A  member of the Hellenic Gerontological and Geriatric Association she  was active in the development of the Greek e-library of  Gerontology and Geriatrics designed for the public, for specialists and researchers. (www.gerolib.gr)

Liz served from 2003 on the Board of AGE-Platform European (www.age-platform.eu) , an umbrella organization of NGOs representing over 30 million older people, and was elected and served as President 2008-2011.  She continues to  advise on  various EU projects concerning new technologies, accessibility, and the human rights of older people.


Abstract
Can ICT e.g. AAL, AI, Ambient Living technologies, really help the growing numbers of older people live better, more fulfilling lives? Or are these technologies primarily being developed for the interest of health and welfare systems and tech development experts? Have we genuinely listened to the needs of older people and reacted to their problems and needs, or are the driving forces behind innovation state budgetary limitations and the management of new and ever expanding problems? Even in the context of management, can these ICT technologies be effective or are they marginal to the management of living with dependency, long term illnesses and alone. Can and in what way do they help make older people's lives more connected, meaningful and richer? Ensure that older people do not become objects, presenting technical problems to be solved, but people who have capacities which technology can help support. The presentation will concern the limitations of current approaches and suggest ways forward to genuinely support older people.



 

 

Technology to support Active Aging - Where we are and where to go to

Miriam Vollenbroek-Hutten
University of Twente
Netherlands
 

Brief Bio
Prof. Miriam Vollenbroek-Hutten She is head of research and innovation at ZiekenhuisGroep Twente, professor at the University of Twente on the chair Technology Supported Coaching and Training and chairman of the EIP on AHA reference site Vitaal Twente. Her research focuses on ICT supported services for diagnostics and treatment for older adults and people experiencing problems with the postural and movement system. Her H-index is 30 and she has over 200 peer reviewed papers. She is supervising a research staff of people with multidisciplinary backgrounds. She has more than 15 years’ experience with management of large (European) projects and coordinated two European project M. Vollenbroek is actively involved in the European EIP-AHA framework as coordinator of the A3 physical activity group.


Abstract
The fast developments of technology offer new possibilities for mobile health-care services, like telemonitoring, teletreatment and personalized coaching services. These services enable people to work on their functional status or health behaviour independently but remotely supervised by professionals when needed. It is likely that these services are more efficient and  effective but they also put the user in the driver seat regarding their own health which fits the current trend to put more focus on self-management and patient-centricity. Despite this great potential, these services are scarcely implemented in daily practice. Reasons for this are the fact that clinicians and patients are lost in the variety of services that apparently exist, they doubt about the acceptance of the services and have no idea on how to start implementation in clinical practice. This presentation will addresses the current status of ICT supported services, it presents examples of how ICT supported services can be implemented in everyday care and it discusses upcoming developments.



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