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Keynote Lectures

Developing User-centric AAL Systems
Juan Carlos Augusto, School of Science and Technology, Middlesex University, United Kingdom

Cloud Computing and Big Data Can Improve the Quality of Our Life
Victor Chang, Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, China

Auditory Displays for Ambient Intelligence – Perspectives for Smart Environments
Thomas Hermann, CITEC - Center of Excellence Cognitive Interaction Technology, Bielefeld University, Germany

Community Assessment of Risk Screening and Treatment Strategies (CARTS) - An Update
William Molloy, Centre for Gerontology and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, UCC, Ireland

 

Developing User-centric AAL Systems

Juan Carlos Augusto
School of Science and Technology, Middlesex University
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio

Dr. Augusto is Professor of Computer Science at Middlesex University London. His research interest and contributions are focused on the design and implementation of Intelligent Environments with special interest in making systems more intelligent and reliable and on applications in the domains of Ambient Assisted Living and Education.
He is the Head of the Research GrOup On Development of Intelligent EnvironmentS (GOODIES) which is a multi-disciplinary group with a wide range of skills in fundamental Computer Science areas (software engineering, artificial intelligence, networking, and interfaces) as well as more specific areas like context-awareness, user-centric design and mixed-reality systems.
He has contributed to the research community with more than 200 publications, including several co-edited books: Designing Smart Homes (Springer, 2006), Advances in Ambient Intelligence (IOS Press, 2007), Human-Centric Interfaces for Ambient Intelligence (Academic Press, 2009), the Handbook on Ambient Intelligence and Smart Environments (Springer, 2009), and the Handbook on Ambient Assisted Living (IOS Press, 2012).
He has given several invited talks and tutorials for international workshops and conferences mostly related to Ambient Assisted Living and Ambient Intelligence.  He has also chaired numerous technical events.  More recently he has been General co-Chair of EvAAL’13 and Program co-Chair of Intelligent Environments 2013 (Athens, Greece), Workshops co-Chair of Intelligent Environments 2014 (Shanghai, PRC) and Keynotes Chair of Intelligent Environments 2015 (Prague, Czech Republic).
He was appointed as Editor in Chief of three journals, including the recently created Journal on Reliable Intelligent Environments (Springer), the Journal on Ambient Intelligence and Smart Environments (IOS Press) and the Transactions on Future Intelligent Educational Environments (EAI). He is also Editor in Chief of the well established Book Series on Ambient Intelligence and Smart Environments and participates as Editorial Board member of other journals.
He has participated from 14 research projects, leading half of them, and currently leading the Middlesex University team for an EU funded project: “PersOnalized Smart Environments to increase Inclusion of people with DOwn's syndrome (POSEIDON)". He is a member of several advisory boards, an external referee for EU funding calls and an advisor for different EU funding programmes.
He is a member of the following professional organizations: IEEE (SMC branch), BCS (British Computer Society), ACM, and AAAI. Furthermore he  has been recognized as AAAI Senior Member (2014) and BCS Professional Fellow (2011) by the British Computer Society. For more details please visit: http://www.jcaugusto.com/


Abstract
More than a decade of enthusiastic development in the area of Ambient Assisted Living systems have produced a good number of systems, have thought us many lessons, has shown that there are any fascinating applications which can improve the quality of life of citizens and that there are great market opportunities linked to innovation in this area.  However, market uptake is slow and not many of the system have been adopted or the results have not been as optimistic as first imagined.  This keynote will examine some of the issues surrounding the development of this systems and focus on methodologies and tools which can help our community to develop systems which are more fit for purpose.



 

 

Cloud Computing and Big Data Can Improve the Quality of Our Life

Victor Chang
Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University
China
 

Brief Bio
Victor Chang is an Associate Professor (Reader) in Information Management and Information Systems of International Business School Suzhou, Xi'an Jiaotong Liverpool University, China. He's also a Director of PhD Program. He was previously a Senior Lecturer in the School of Computing, Creative Technologies at Leeds Beckett University, UK. He’s a Visiting Researcher at the University of Southampton, UK and an Honorary Associate Professor at the University of Liverpool, UK. He is an expert on Cloud Computing and Big Data in both academia and industry with extensive experience in related areas since 1998. He completed a PGCert (Higher Education) and PhD (Computer Science) within four years while working full-time. He has over 100 peer-reviewed published papers. He won £20,000 funding in 2001 and £81,000 funding in 2009. He was involved in part of the £6.5 million project in 2004, part of the £5.6 million project in 2006 and part of a £300,000 project in 2013. He won a 2011 European Identity Award in Cloud Migration, since his work is making contributions. He has won 2016 European Identity and Cloud Award on the best project in research, involved with more than 20 collaborators worth more than $10 millions in valuation. He was selected to present his research in the House of Commons in 2011 and won the best paper in 2012 and 2015. He has demonstrated Storage as a Service, Health Informatics as a Service, Financial Software as a Service, Education as a Service, Big Data Processing as a Service, Integration as a Service, Security as a Service, Social Network as a Service, Data Visualization as a Service (Weather Science) and Consulting as Service in Cloud Computing and Big Data services in both of his practitioner and academic experience. His proposed frameworks have been adopted by several organizations. He is the founding chair of international workshops in Emerging Software as a Service and Analytics and Enterprise Security. He is the founding chair of IoTBDS and COMPLEXIS which have become popular in research communities. He is an Editor-in-Chief (EIC) in International Journal of Organizational and Collective Intelligence and a founding EIC in Open Journal of Big Data. He is the Editor of a highly prestigious journal, Future Generation Computer Systems (FGCS). He is a reviewer of numerous well-known journals and had published three books on Cloud Computing which are available on Amazon website. He is a keynote speaker for CLOSER 2015/WEBIST2015/ICTforAgeingWell 2015 and has received positive support. Dr. Victor has given or will give 10 international keynotes since the end of Year 2016. He has won the Outstanding Young Scientist of Year 2017 this February.


Abstract
The rise of Cloud Computing and Big Data has played influential roles in the evolution of IT services and has made significant contributions to different disciplines. For example, there are ten services that cannot be achieved without the combined effort from Cloud Computing and Big Data techniques: They are Storage as a Service, Health Informatics as a Service, Financial Software as a Service, Business Intelligence as a Service, Education as a Service, Big Data Processing as a Service, Integration as a Service, Security as a Service, Social Network as a Service and Data Visualization as a Service (Weather Science) respectively, in which the keynote speaker will summarize the motivation, methods, results and contributions in each service. He will explain how the unique services can improve the quality of our life by understanding the complex biological and physiological science and ensuring the best approaches of treatments and actions can be adopted. These include development projects and successful deliveries in brain segmentation and learning, proteins and body defense mechanisms, tumor studies and DNA sequencing. Research and enterprise contributions to other disciplines are available which include Business Intelligence as a Service to provide accurate and up-to-date tracking of risk and prices with regard to the investment, as well as contributions for weather data visualization and forecasting to inform the general public about the consequences of the extreme weather.



 

 

Auditory Displays for Ambient Intelligence – Perspectives for Smart Environments

Thomas Hermann
CITEC - Center of Excellence Cognitive Interaction Technology, Bielefeld University
Germany
 

Brief Bio
Thomas Hermann is director of the Ambient Intelligence Group within the Center of Excellence in Cognitive Interaction Technology (CITEC) at Bielefeld University, Germany. His research interests include sonification, ambient intelligence, human-computer interaction, and cognitive interaction technology. After his physics degree he received a PhD in computer science from Bielefeld University. He served on the Board of Directors of ICAD (2004-2013), as vice-chair of the EU COST Action Sonic Interaction Design (2007-2011) and coordinated the working group on Sonification therein. He is member of the scientific board of directors of CITEC at Bielefeld University. He cofounded together with Andy Hunt the Interactive Sonification Workshop series and coedited The Sonification Handbook (Logos Verlag, 2011) together with Andy Hunt and John Neuhoff.


Abstract
Sound is an often neglected carrier of information when it comes to computer interfaces. This talk will focus on how sound can contribute to improve the interaction of users with their environment, including the information environment, with tools, and with each other. Auditory Display and Sonification will be introduced and examples will illustrate how information can be made audible using non-speech but also synthesized vocal sounds. Selected examples of systems developed at CITEC in Bielefeld show how interfaces can be designed to control and interact with sonifications. This leads to sonification systems that make the behaviors of the human user itself audible, for instance to help to avoid unhealthy behaviors or to support sports exercise.

Sound plays also an important role in organizing attention: a system for using sounds to increase joint attention of cooperating users in an Augmented Reality condition will be shown.  Furthermore, some recent developements of our research at Bielefeld University are shown that use 'Blended Sonification' and 'Auditory Augmentation' to couple information spaces to the physical environment.

We will sketch how these and other approaches come together in our large-scale project 'The Cognitive Service Robotics Apartment as Ambient Host' where a mobile robot with anthropormophic head and an instrumented environment cooperate to render 24/7 services to users.



 

 

Community Assessment of Risk Screening and Treatment Strategies (CARTS) - An Update

William Molloy
Centre for Gerontology and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, UCC
Ireland
 

Brief Bio

The Centre for Gerontology and Rehabilitation (CGR), School of Medicine, U.C.C. is led by Prof David William Molloy, Geriatrician and Chair in Clinical Gerontology, and is based in St Finbarr’s Hospital. The Centre was established in September 2010 is funded by Atlantic Philanthropies with a specific remit to establish interdisciplinary teaching and learning in Gerontology, Rehabilitation and End of Life Care in UCC and to raise the standard of care of the elderly in the South of Ireland. Prof Molloy received his medical degree from University College Cork in 1977 and became a member of the Royal College of Physicians Ireland (RCPI) in 1980. He then moved to Canada where he was appointed Professor of Medicine at McMaster University (1988) and  St. Peter’s McMaster Chair in Aging (2002) where he remained until 2010 when he returned to Ireland to take up his position as Chair of Clinical Gerontology. Vastly experienced in the area of cognitive impairment, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, Prof Molloy has a proven track record in successful grant applications, co-ordinating multi-centre studies and recruiting large numbers of patients for research. Since his arrival in U.C.C., the CGR has secured funding from a number of sources including the Health Research Board (HRB) and the Irish Hospice Foundation (IHF).  Prof Molloy is a co-investigator in NILVAD and PERSSILAA (EU-FP7 funded trials). A recognised expert on capacity he has published over 140 peer-reviewed articles and several books.  To promote the autonomy of the elderly, he wrote the advance health care directive, “Let Me Decide”.  It has had 25 editions and is published in several languages and has recently been published in Ireland for the first time.  


Abstract
More people with multiple co-morbidities and complex needs are living longer in the community, increasing the demand for limited healthcare services. In the EU, approximately 30% of people >65 years are frail and almost 60% are in a pre-frail state. Older frail people account for the highest healthcare costs in developed countries. Frailty is difficult to define because it is multifaceted. One way of conceptualising frailty, is as a state of increased vulnerability to various stresses, with increased risk of adverse healthcare outcomes (AO) such as institutionalisation, hospitalisation, and death. Frailty may be reversed when it is independent of disease and disability. The existing healthcare response to frailty is predominantly reactive. A proactive, integrated, and community-based response is required. One approach is to screen for frailty and perform comprehensive assessments with treatment to minimise, delay or prevent AO. This approach will enable targeted delivery of early interventions and prioritise limited resources.

The CARTS project is a programme to screen older adults at risk of frailty, using the Risk Instrument for Screening in the Community (RISC). Those at moderate/high risk are triaged for secondary assessment using the Community Assessment of Risk Instrument (CARI), to identify specific issues that increase the older person’s risk. Evidence-based, proven treatment strategies are implemented to reduce risk and delay or prevent frailty, and AO.

The RISC has been validated with community-dwelling older adults in Portugal (n=5,500), Australia (n=500), Spain (n=350), and Ireland (n=800). Follow-up is currently underway with these groups to identify whether those with higher RISC scores, have increased rates of AO. The treatment strategies are also currently being piloted. The prevalence and natural history of risk, the inter-rater reliability and predictive validity of the instruments, will be presented and discussed.



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